News

5/26/2014

 

IAUS's Breakthrough May Open a New Era for Electronic Technologies and Renewable Energy

 

What if electric cars, cell phones, laptops, and electric hand tools could recharge within seconds, or renewable energy suddenly became less expensive than coal? IAUS believes that its new voltage controller will make these possibilities a reality.

 

IAUS's patented, Dynamic Voltage Controller (DVC) is the first technology capable of handling and converting a full range of variable voltage on the fly to a constant DC or AC voltage and frequency output. It can also convert a constant input voltage to a variable output. This new device operates without transformers or coils, making it much lighter and significantly more compact than today's transformers and inverters. For most uses, it can be reduced to the size of a silicon chip.

 

Applications for the DVC range from quick-charge batteries, computers, cell phones, electric cars, electric appliances, electric tools, photo-voltaic solar, concentrated solar, wind energy, ocean wave energy, robotics, the smart grid, and many other electronic circuit based technologies.

 

For example, a wind turbine using IAUS's new voltage controller could operate at variable speeds without the need for a heavy mechanical gearing system, or large-diameter generator. Nearly 50% of the cost could be eliminated, in addition to an increase in efficiency. As a result, not only would wind energy likely become less expensive than coal, even micro wind turbines for individuals would be extremely economical.

 

The DVC will also allow capacitors to function like a battery by converting its variable output to a constant voltage. Capacitors charge in a matter of seconds. Electric cars, cell phones, laptops, electric hand tools, etc. could be recharged almost instantly.

 

Currently, the global market for consumer electronic products is roughly $1.5 Trillion annually. The global energy market is over $3 Trillion.

 

A patent for this new technology has been awarded. Additional patents have been applied for, and a prototype has been built. This prototype was successfully demonstrated to a third-party expert who wrote a review of the concept and potential applications. The following is an excerpt:

 

“The concept of this voltage controller is sound. A basic prototype has now been constructed and demonstrated to verify the practicality of the concept.

 

“In principle, the voltage controller can be applied to several important areas of present day electronic circuit activity and to high energy systems with the potential to improve the performance-to-cost ratio of several important existing systems.”

 

Details of IAUS's expert review, and the author's identity will be made available by IAUS only to qualified inquiries under a strict non-disclosure agreement. His background includes a PhD in Electrical Engineering, and over thirty years of teaching experience at a well-respected, major university where he is currently a professor. He has been a Dean of Engineering, served as a Department Chair, authored a number of text books on circuit design, and has been published numerous times in trade journals. In addition, he has worked as a consultant for IBM, Intel, and Lawrence Livermore Laboratories, and is a Fellow of IEEE.

 

“We have successfully built and demonstrated a prototype of our new voltage controller. From here, we intend to develop marketable products. With the right strategic partners, our next step could be achieved in a relatively short amount of time,” said Neldon Johnson, President and CEO of IAUS. “We expect this voltage controller to bring revolutionary advancements to areas of renewable energy as well as everyday electronic applications that will potentially impact the day-to-day lives of many, many people throughout the world.”

 

IAUS.PK – International Automated Systems, Inc. is a publicly traded company with offices in Utah. For more information, visit their website at: www.iaus.com.

 

Note: Statements contained in this release that are not strictly historical are forward-looking within the meaning of the "Safe Harbor" provisions of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. Such statements are made based upon information available to the company at the time, and the company assumes no obligation to update or revise such forward-looking statements. Editors and investors are cautioned that such forward-looking statements invoke risk and uncertainties that may cause the company's actual results to differ materially from such forward-looking statements. These risks and uncertainties include, but are not limited to, demand for the company's product both domestically and abroad, the company's ability to continue to develop its market, general economic conditions, and other factors that may be more fully described in the company's literature and periodic filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission.